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SPRING PILGRIMAGE

March 9 – April 9, 2024


  • Spring Pilgrimage 2024!

Stately Greek Revival Mansion surrounded by historic gardens, Green Leaves is one of the great Natchez houses where succeeding generations of a single family have carefully preserved the original furnishings and extensive family memorabilia that dates to the mid 1800s. Step back in time and experience over 170 years of Natchez history!

  • Spring Pilgrimage 2024!

The largest octagonal home remaining in America, Longwood is a superb example of the mid-nineteenth century “villa in the oriental style”. Construction halted when the Civil War began, causing artisans to leave behind their tools, paint brushes, and lovely Longwood, never to be brought to completion.

  • Spring Pilgrimage 2024!

Rosalie, a magnificent example of the Federal Style, played a significant role in American History as the Union Headquarters during the Civil War. Rosalie’s John Henry Belter parlor furniture, twenty-one pieces in all, are among the finest examples of his work still in existence.

  • Spring Pilgrimage 2024!

Routhland boasts of unusual architecture and houses some of the finest antiques. Generous grounds shaded by century-old oaks and cypress, form a picturesque path to the entrance. The wide gallery, with white pillars entwined with century-old Southern Jasmine, bids a friendly reception.

  • Spring Pilgrimage 2024!

Ravenna built in 1835-1836 by the contracting firm of Neibert & Gemmell for successful entrepreneur William Harris, was one of the first examples of residential Greek Revival designs to be attempted in Natchez, MS. Come enjoy a tour of one of the original Natchez Pilgrimage featured homes!

  • Spring Pilgrimage 2024!

The facade of Rip Rap features one of Natchez’s grandest residential essays in Italianate style with its cast-iron gallery arcades and decorative window cornices. Surrounded by graceful live oaks, Rip Rap was constructed in the mid-1830s for successful Natchez merchant Benjamin Wade and his wife, Zelia Robitaille Wade.

  • Spring Pilgrimage 2024!

Lansdowne has been occupied by descendants of the original builder since its inception.  Mid-nineteenth-century Zuber wallpaper adorns the parlor with its intricate designs and delicate colors. At the entrance of Lansdowne, wide steps rise from a brick pavement, flanked by aged carriage mounting blocks.

  • Spring Pilgrimage 2024!

As constructed in 1851, Bontura was a simple, Greek Revival brick townhouse with typical side-hall plan. The picturesque double-tiered cast-iron gallery is a late 19th-century addition. An outstanding feature of the property is the rear carriage house with an arcade of carriage openings.

  • New Home - Spring Pilgrimage 2024!

Propinquity dates to the early period of the Mississippi territory and is one of the earliest houses of the Federal architectural style. Secluded among ancient live oaks just outside Natchez in the historic territorial capital of Washington, Mississippi. Renowned for its original Federal-style millwork and has retained its architectural integrity.

  • Spring Pilgrimage 2024!

As the home of the first Mississippi Attorney General, Auburn established the style of the columned portico in the South and boasts a freestanding spiral staircase to the second floor.  Architect Levi Weeks, defendant in the first transcribed murder trial in US history, designed Auburn after his acquittal. Was he innocent? Come hear the story and decide for yourself!

  • New Home - Spring Pilgrimage 2024!

The Briars was commissioned by Judge John Perkins and designed and built in 1818 by noted Natchez architect Levi Weeks. The home is built in the typical southern planter style vernacular with outstanding Federal millwork throughout including the interlaced arched windows of its dormers. The 95 foot front gallery is accented by a monumental fanlit central doorway with matching secondary floral laced fanlit entrances at either end of the gallery, a unique feature to the design.  The Briars was the childhood home of Mrs. Jefferson Davis, (Varina) whose family resided though never owned the home from 1826 to 1850; serving as the site where on February 26, 1845, Jefferson and Varina were married by the local Episcopal priest, The Rev. David C. Page of Trinity Church.

 

  • New Home - Spring Pilgrimage 2024!

Located at one of the most historically significant intersections in the Natchez area during Spain’s occupation of Natchez from 1783-1798 sets this charming home, known today as Holly Hedges.

Although its earliest history dates to 1796 when a structure was built by Mr. John Scott, who received a Spanish grant on what was known as Block 1; it is believed Holly Hedges took its current form by 1805 when his widow, Susanna petitioned for a deed to the lot where the home she was building (or remodeling)sits today.

Of great significance in the chain of ownership of Holly Hedges is the tenure of the John T. McMurran family who lived here until their massive suburban estates Melrose was completed in 1848. Melrose is today the crown jewel of The Natchez National Historical Park.

Still later, Holly Hedges became the Natchez home of celebrated Dallas interior designer Earl Hart Miller and his wife Zan, who in 1948 completely restored the Federal era home and added the interlaced Federal style dormers and celebrated parterre garden to the original home giving it added visual appeal and gave the home the name Holly Hedges.